Typhoo 80 Tea Bags (Best By Oct 2019)

$7.49
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Typhoo Tea in a Box of 80 Tea Bags
Learn more about Typhoo Tea in this video:



Typhoo is one of the world's most popular English Teas.

Available in the distinctive red box, Typhoo is a smooth, English Tea full of flavor and body.

This is authentic Typhoo, imported directly from England.  Inside, you will find the tea bags packed in foil packages to preserve freshness and taste. Each box includes 2 foil packages of 40 tea bags each (for a total of 80 tea bags in each box).

With Typhoo, you get a tea that has over 100 years of history.  Typhoo was started in 1903 by John Sumner, grocer in Birmingham, England.

If you are looking for an English Tea similar to Typhoo, we suggest PG Tips, another great tea from England.

If you want to limit your caffeine, we suggest Typhoo Decaf Tea.

This is one of the earliest slogans for Typhoo Tea. In Latin, it translates as "System Conquers All"

Early Typhoo Logo

Ingredients:
Black tea.

Brand History:
Typhoo Tea
England

Launched in 1903 by Birmingham, England, grocer John Sumner, Typhoo has been waking tea drinkers for nearly 100 years. Today, Typhoo is one of world's favorite teas.

Raised in a grocery business family, Sumner, was born on February 26, 1856 in Birmingham. At the turn of the 20th century, the business had extensive stock of wine and spirits, a stout and cider bottling brand and a grocery side. Sumner successfully ran the business for years but sought a specialty product to develop.

He found the answer when his sister, who suffered from indigestion, tried a special tea made from tiny particles, not the large leaf variety that was common. Sumner decided that, instead of selling the tea loose over the counter, he would packet the tea under a brand name. He settled on Typhoo Tipps. Typhoo meaning, in part, the Chinese word for doctor. The double p in Tipps was originally a printing error but remained misspelled on the packets of tea for years.

Typhoo was the first brand of tea to be sold pre-packaged rather than loose over the counter. In order to encourage his customers to purchase the tea, Sumner gave away a jar of cream to each person that bought a pound packet. The tea quickly became popular and customers were becoming loyal to the brand that, even though a little more expensive, went further and had digestive qualities.

Word of mouth recommendation from his customers led beyond his regular clientele and soon other grocers were asking to purchase the Ty.phoo tea, inspiring a wholesale business.

In 1905, Sumner closed the grocery business to focus on the tea. On July 29, 1905 , Typhoo Tea Ltd was incorporated. Sumner drew attention to tea made from the edge of the leaf. This pure-edge leaf tea produced 80 more cups to the pound than ordinary tea and also cut out the stalk that contained tannin and caused indigestion.

As early as 1906 Sumner sold Typhoo branded teapots to customers. He also inserted circulars into the tea packets to highlight its benefits, and included picture cards on a range of subjects, which became very collectible. By the mid 1960s, Ty.phoo was annually packing more than 80 million pounds of tea and exporting to 40 countries worldwide.

In the late 1960s, the company merged with Schweppes, the famous soft drinks firm, and formed a new company called Typhoo Schweppes. A year later, Cadbury's also joined the conglomeration, creating Cadbury Schweppes Typhoo.

In 1986 Typhoo was sold and the new company called Premier Brands. Premier continued to expand its tea operation by acquiring the herbal tea market leader, London Herb & Spice.

In 1989 Premier Brands was bought by Hillsdown Holdings and then in 1999 by Hicks Muse Tate and Furst. Further product developments were seen in 1999 when Typhoo became the first tea brand to introduce a green tea blend to the UK market and, in 2004, with the launch of Typhoo Fruit and Herb.

5 Reviews Hide Reviews Show Reviews

  • 5
    dark english tea

    Posted by Unknown on Apr 8th 2018

    I drink this all the time. One of my favorite. If you like a dark, robust tea, this is the tea for you.

  • 5
    Great Tea! from a TG TIBs Fan

    Posted by Larry on Feb 12th 2018

    I enjoy strong black tea and usually steep a loose organic black tea. When traveling I fill in with TIBs, until I was introduced to Typhoo. It is better, stronger, easier and if you space a bit, it doesn't go south in bitterness... Originally I bought it online through Amazon (once); but their provider sold expired tea or decaffeinated. They couldn't get the order right (3 after trys I quit . I have found Teadog.com reliable and fairly priced..Would love free shipping...but alas can't get it all...

  • 5
    Typhoo

    Posted by richard wernsing on Sep 20th 2017

    I love Typhoo black tea nice and string and taste
    We got started on Typhoo when we were unable to Marks and Spenser Gold tea.

  • 5
    Typhoo Tea "Supreme"

    Posted by Unknown on Nov 19th 2012

    The most popular tea in England? I should say so. This tea can be enjoyed any time of the day or evening. It is smooth and malty. I drink other teas, but this is the one I keep coming back to.

  • 5
    Typhoo Tea - the real thing

    Posted by Unknown on May 21st 2009

    Forget those American "English Breakfast" labeled teas, those are pale pantywaists compared to Typhoo.

    As a boy growing up in England, this is the tea that our milkman left us if we checked the "Leave Tea" box on our order form. It is very hearty in the English manner and, in my opinion, made to drink "white" (with cream or milk) as its strength and bitterness when consumed without cream is a bit much. With cream and appropriate sweetener, on the other hand, the mixture of flavors is just the thing for one's morning, eye-opener cuppa.

    If your exposure to black tea is via Twinings, Tazo, or, worst, Liptons, try the real thing and taste the enervating difference.